Word of the Year: “Post-Truth”…and Finding “Balance” with Yin and Yang

The Washington Post reports: “It’s official: Truth is dead. Facts are passe.” The Oxford Dictionaries have declared “Post-Truth” as the “word of the year.”
“In this case, the “post-” prefix doesn’t mean “after” so much as it implies an atmosphere in which a notion is irrelevant — but then again, who says you have to take our word for it anymore?”

The term came into common use after the Brexit campaign and the U.S. presidential election. Trump’s “pinochio rating” on how many lies he told in the campaign was higher than any other person to have run for that office, and yet it made no difference to his supporters.

Scott Preston, at The Chrysalis blog, has been following the “post-truth” meme for quite a while, and has numerous posts discussing it in a Gebserian/integral frame. Especially in his flurry of posts since the election. In The End of the End of History, he writes,

“…some may conclude that I’m just whistling past the graveyard in suggesting — following Gebser — that “post-truth” is a simultaneous destruction and restructuration of truth, and consequently of “human nature”, consciousness, humanism, and universality and so on. They may be right. But I hope to give further reasons why we can anticipate “post-truth society” as an essential restructuration including the very meaning and understanding of “truth” itself, and why vox populi, vox dei [“the Voice of the People is the Voice of God”] implies an essential truthfulness despite appearances to the contrary and the weakness of the ego-nature.”

Finding “Balance” with Yin and Yang

This also relates to The Chrysalis blog.  The other day Scott had an insightful post, also related to this “Post-Truth” theme: Our Post-Truth Era and the Coincidentia Oppositorum. Another very good post worth your time.  But it was a comment to that post by Steve Lavendusky that eventually led me to this second subject of Balance and Yin/Yang.
Steve posted the Seven Principles of the Order of the Universe and the Twelve Theorems of the Unifying Principle by George Oshawa, the founder of Macrobiotics. I found that pretty fascinating, and then found another page from that website on the subject  “Misconceptions About Yin and Yang: The Goal is Not Balance But is Imbalance.”

This page offers some key insights into the Polarity pattern, and what it means to “balance” patterns for enduring health. This could be of interest to any PatternDynamics practitioners. We shouldn’t think of “balance” as a static thing, but rather as “balancing” – a process that is fluid, dynamic, and on an ever changing continuum. Stability, rest, and coming back to center are healthy pursuits, but perhaps we should think of it as a process of bringing the ongoing flux into some kind of control. Working towards a centering process that has a polarity swing in a narrow range, rather than wild swings to the extremes. And yet we still need to maintain an openness and resilience in response to the wilder swings life throws our way, taking them as opportunities for needed change. Chaotic transitions can lead to much needed positive change.

The author of the piece (Phiya Kushi) below frames the yin/yang polarity as “seeking imbalance and the creation of dynamic polarity.” This is his way to set up a contrast with our common understanding of “balance.”:

“There is a prevalent and even an a priori like assumption that the stated and desired goal of yin and yang is always to achieve balance and that when they are balanced then everything is stable, is in harmony and all is at peace and flows smoothly. This is a misconception. Let me explain.

Nothing in this universe is ever in perfect balance with the exception of the entire universe itself. In all its manifestations, the goal and direction of yin and yang is actually towards imbalance and the creation of a dynamic polarity. This imbalance and polarity is the source of movement and change itself and gives rise to the continuous creation of all phenomena. The greater the imbalance, the greater the polarity then the greater the movement and dynamic change.”

Read the rest of the article here.

 

 

Advertisements

7 comments on “Word of the Year: “Post-Truth”…and Finding “Balance” with Yin and Yang

  1. Indeed, perfect balance is stasis, and is what Blake called “Fearful Symmetry”. There are reasons for that related equally to the fact that the infinite and the finite (or the eternal and the temporal) may never reach symmetry.

  2. davidm58 says:

    I should give some credit here to my wife Angela, who assisted in the writing of this key paragraph:
    “We shouldn’t think of “balance” as a static thing, but rather as “balancing” – a process that is fluid, dynamic, and on an ever changing continuum. Stability, rest, and coming back to center are healthy pursuits, but perhaps we should think of it as a process of bringing the ongoing flux into some kind of control. Working towards a centering process that has a polarity swing in a narrow range, rather than wild swings to the extremes. And yet we still need to maintain an openness and resilience in response to the wilder swings life throws our way, taking them as opportunities for needed change. Chaotic transitions can lead to much needed positive change.”
    nth
    Angela took a deep dive into macrobiotics quite a few years ago, studying with Herman and Cornelia Aihara, who were students of George Oshawa and were the premier teachers of macrobiotics on the west coast.

    Secondly, in reference to The Chrysalis blog – it can sometimes be a deep,complex, and esoteric labyrinth, making it difficult for new readers to find their footing. Scott has recently provided a helpful overview of his project for new readers in a post entitled “Dark Age and Chrysalis stage here: https://longsworde.wordpress.com/2016/11/17/dark-age-and-chrysalis-stage/

    And here: https://longsworde.wordpress.com/2016/11/18/dark-age-and-chrysalis-stage-ii/

    I would say the primary influences on The Chrysalis are Jean Gebser, Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, and William Blake, with numerous others continually added to the mix (such as more contemporary .writers like Iain McGilchrist and Peter Pogany).

  3. I believe this is how superstitions develop? Scientifically inaccurate explanations that explain one’s worldview?

  4. abdulmonem says:

    I do not feel at comfort with sweeping statements,such as god is dead or truth is dead or facts are passe or yin is transformed into yin or vice versa, without qualification, knowing that opposite never changed their identity although they may replace each other in the game of life. The pendulum in his slow swing or fast swing is changing its position not its identity and that is exactly the conduct of the vibrational swing of life both physically and spiritually and here where the role of the human is paramount in fine-tuning the swing to ward as you said control and not balance, since we are in a continual process of balancing as a result of the continual change in the life events in the realm of the one or the many. I remember an old Arabic saying which states, We are people who do not eat until we get hungry and when we eat we leave the table while we still desire the food. Biological and spiritual control move together to produce the effective outcome. Thank and your wife for trying to put lucidity in the way of those who want to grow holistically.

  5. davidm58 says:

    abdulmonem, yes, the WA Post was engaging in some hyperbole there with the truth is dead/facts are passe statement. You do a fine job of tying part 1 of the post with part 2.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s